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Tyler Boulware

History can be inspiring and uplifting. It can also be offensive. And that is a good thing. It means our ideas about what is ethical, moral, and decent have changed – hopefully in an evolving and progressive way – and we use that to evaluate past human thought and behavior. When nineteenth-century Americans, for instance, used the terms “savage,” “barbarian,” and “redskin” to describe Native Americans, few individuals at the time voiced their displeasure. We may afford them some leniency because of an ingrained prejudice in American society; many didn’t know better. But we do. There is no place for such terms as “redskin” in our twenty-first century vocabulary. The continuance of this demeaning mascot, especially in our nation’s capital, unfortunately shows the limits of racial progress and the failures of leadership. Hopefully, enough Americans will begin to see that there is indeed a problem with "Indian" sports mascots. 

Tyler Boulware's Webpage

Tyler Boulware

History can be inspiring and uplifting. It can also be offensive. And that is a good thing. It means our ideas about what is ethical, moral, and decent have changed – hopefully in an evolving and progressive way – and we use that to evaluate past human thought and behavior. When nineteenth-century Americans, for instance, used the terms “savage,” “barbarian,” and “redskin” to describe Native Americans, few individuals at the time voiced their displeasure. We may afford them some leniency because of an ingrained prejudice in American society; many didn’t know better. But we do. There is no place for such terms as “redskin” in our twenty-first century vocabulary. The continuance of this demeaning mascot, especially in our nation’s capital, unfortunately shows the limits of racial progress and the failures of leadership. Hopefully, enough Americans will begin to see that there is indeed a problem with "Indian" sports mascots. 

Tyler Boulware's Webpage